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Review - Tiandirenhe TD02 (sub 50€)

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Also available on YouTube in Spanish: Acho Reviews YouTube 



I have absolutely no idea who Tiandirenhe is, in fact, I have issues to even remember the name without looking it up, but I came across them while browsing AE and liked the look of these IEMs so I decided to give them a try, I mean, for 15€ they are worth it just for the looks.

I didn’t even know the model name of the IEMs and there was no mention of it anywhere in the listing or on the IEMs I received, so I sent a message to the seller who replied that they are the Tiandirenhe TD02. So I guess I at least know what they are now.



Presentation…

The IEMs were available with or without cable, which seems to be a more common thing lately, and so I opted for the version without cable as I already have more cables that I will ever need.

The IEMs appeared in a padded envelope and were inside a red semi-rigid storage case. Inside the case were the IEMs, a plastic bag containing a selection of sizes of silicone tips along with a small rigid case containing a set of double flanged tips and a set of foam tips (in red and blue).



Build and aesthetics…

I really like the aesthetics of the TD02, with the clear resin body and a tinted part, blue on the left and red on the right, sporting the Tiandirenhe branding in gold. They certainly look like they cost more than 15€.

The IEMs also seem to be well built, as far as simple poured resin IEMs go, with no obvious flaws or sharp edges. They are comfortable to wear and my only complaint would be the MMCX connectors.

My complaint is not because there is an issue with the connectors on this specific IEM, they seem to be of decent quality and the NiceHCK cable I am using fits perfectly, I have just grown wary of MMCX connectors due to issues in the past.



Sound…

I will go straight out and say that I am happily surprised by the sound of the TD02. I didn’t know what to expect but what I got is nothing to complain about at this price.

The IEMs use a single dynamic driver inside a copper chamber. I am not sure if this is something that benefits the driver much but it is really the only thing they promote in their listing, there is no mention of the driver size etc.

In the sub-bass, there is a decent amount of extension, making 30Hz still audible although there is a bit of a roll off under 40Hz. This means that tracks that present a decent amount of sub-bass, such as “Chameleon” by Trentemoller, are not absent in the low end.

In the general bass regions, bass is well presented and is not overly boosted, giving a good presence without feeling bloated. The single dynamic driver also does a decent job of controlling the low hits, allowing music to sound natural in the case of real instruments but also powerful enough for electronic music. I enjoyed the bass on all kinds of music, from Tupacs “Ambitionz az a Ridah” through to “No Sanctuary Here” by Marian Herzog and Chris Jones. It is probably not enough for those heavy bass lovers out there but is plenty for my tastes.

The lower mids have enough warmth for acoustic instruments to sound natural, such as Johnny Cash’s guitar in “Hurt” but does not really suffer from bleeding of the bass. It is not the cleanest transition from bass to lower mids but is not something that stands out as an issue unless I specifically look for it.

The mids do not give the sensation of being recessed, allowing the root notes of voices, both male and female, to be present enough. There is a little bit of a dip in the center of the mids but just like the transition from bass to lower mids, it is really only apparent when looking for it.

Vocals also don’t come across as harsh, making me feel that the slight boost around 3kHz is not overly done. In fact, I think vocals could be a little clearer up top as they do have a bit more smoothness to them than I would personally prefer. This does stop these IEMs from being harsh at all in those regions. Even the harsher voices, such as Beth in “Don’t You Worry Child”, are smoothed to a point where they are not offensive.

When moving up into the higher ranges, there is just a hint of sibilance in tracks such as “Code Cool” or “Hope is a Dangerous Thing”. They don’t completely eliminate sibilance but don’t exaggerate it like so many other IEMs in this range.

If I had to complain, which I don’t but I usually do, it would be in regards to the higher treble and the lack of extension. There is the typical single dynamic driver roll off and it could do with just a little more air in the higher regions but this is again not terribly bad.

As far as detail, these are not overly detailed IEMs but they don’t sound muddy and out of control, even with busy tracks such as “The Room” by Ostura. These aren’t going to present the amount of detail found in higher end IEMs or in decent hybrid offerings but do have enough to allow you enjoy the music.

The width is actually slightly more than most budget IEMs but it is still not much more than average. The image placement inside the soundstage is decent, not quite millimetric but enough to enjoy binaural recordings and appreciate movement in songs like “Bubbles” by Yosi Horikawa.



Conclusion…

Going back to the fact that these are 15€ IEMs (admittedly without the cable), I am rather impressed by them. They are a warmish sounding set that are not overly boosted in the lows and do lack a little bit of presence in the highs for my preferences, but I find them enjoyable.

I would not choose these IEMs to sit down and dissect a song, however, for general listening purposes, I think they are above a lot of the competition in the sub 50€ category. I wouldn’t place them in competition with some of my sub-50€ favourites, such as the Tin T2+ or even the DQ6 and ZAX (which are now available around the 50€ mark) but I would not complain if I used them daily for some BGM while doing other things.

Again, for 15€, these are without a doubt worth their price.

SenyorC